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Knee Ligament Tears

Whether you're an athlete, an industrial worker, or just someone trying to get about their day, tearing a ligament in your knee can be a debilitating injury. Knee ligament tears can sideline you for weeks or months, and may even require surgery to correct. But with the help of the team at Barrington Orthopedic Specialists, you can get back on your feet and on with your life.

At Barrington Orthopedic Specialists, we’re passionate about using the most effective, most conservative, and least aggressive techniques available in the field. We’ll give you the support you need to return to the life you love with an accurate diagnosis, patient-focused care, and treatment plans designed to minimize your pain and accelerate your recovery.

If you’re ready to receive treatment for your knee ligament tear from the most highly-trained providers in the greater Chicago area, don’t wait. Schedule your first appointment with the team at Barrington Orthopedic Specialists.

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Treating ACL Tears, MCL Tears & MPFL Tears

Some of the primary ligaments in the knee include: 

  • The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), located in the middle of the knee.
  • The medial collateral ligament (MCL), located on the inner side of the knee.
  • The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), located under the kneecap.

These ligaments connect the bones of the leg to the knee joint, and work together to stabilize the knee, allowing it to move freely while keeping it from shifting out of place. 

Of these, the ACL is the most commonly injured ligament. ACL tears usually occur when the knee is hyperextended, or bent too far backward. This can happen when you land awkwardly from a jump, or when you make a sudden change in direction while running or playing sports. 

A medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear is less common than an ACL tear, but can still occur. The MCL is located on the inner side of the knee, and helps to stabilize the knee joint. MCL tears usually happen when the knee is bent too far outward, such as might happen if you were to take a hard hit from the side while playing sports. 

Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) tears are relatively rare. They occur when the kneecap is dislocated, or pops out of place. This can happen if you fall directly on your kneecap, or if you receive a direct hit to the front of the knee. 

If you suspect you have torn a ligament in your knee, it's important to see a doctor right away. Your specialist will conduct a thorough examination of the knee, testing your range of motion and checking for signs of instability. Imaging tests, such as an X-ray and MRI may be ordered to get a better look at the ligaments and surrounding structures.

If nonsurgical treatment and physical therapy don't relieve your symptoms or stabilize your knee, you may be recommended surgery to repair the ligament. Ligament reconstruction is one of the most common procedures performed to treat anterior cruciate ligament tears. During ACL reconstruction, the torn ligament is removed and replaced with a piece of tendon taken from another part of the body or from a donor (graft).

Knee Ligament Tear FAQ

What are some of the most common symptoms of a knee ligament tear?

The most common symptoms of knee ligament tears include:

  • Pain, swelling, and inflammation in the knee joint.
  • A popping or snapping sound at the time of injury.
  • Inability to put weight on the affected leg.
  • Instability or "giving way" of the knee.

Where is Barrington Orthopedic Specialists located?

Barrington Orthopedic Specialists has multiple conveniently accessible locations across the greater Chicago area. Our offices can be found in:

  • Bartlett, IL
  • Buffalo Grove, IL
  • Elk Grove Village, IL
  • Schaumburg, IL

How can I get started with the best knee injury specialists near me?

At Barrington Orthopedic Specialists, we make it easy to get started with the top orthopedic specialists in Illinois. Just use our online tool to select a time that works for you, and we’ll be in contact shortly.